Enlarging Others

Team members always love and admire a player who is able to help them go to another
level, someone who enlarges them and empowers them to be successful. Players who enlarge their teammates have several things in common:

1. Enlargers Value Their Teammates: Your teammates can tell whether you believe in
them. People’s performances usually reflect the expectations of those they respect.

2. Enlargers Value What Their Teammates Value: Players who enlarge others listen to
discover what their teammates talk about and watch to see what they spend their money on. That kind of knowledge, along with a desire to relate to their fellow players, creates a strong connection.

3. Enlargers Add Value to Their Teammates: Adding value is really the essence of enlarging others. It’s finding ways to help others improve their abilities and attitudes. An enlarger looks for the gifts, talents, and uniqueness in other people, and then helps them to increase those abilities.

4. Enlargers Make Themselves More Valuable: Enlargers work to make themselves better, not only because it benefits them personally, but also because it helps them to help others. If you want to increase the ability of a teammate, make yourself better.

How do your teammates see you? Are you an enlarger? Do you make them better than
they are alone through your inspiration and contribution? Do you know what your
teammates value? Do you capitalize on those things by adding value to them in those
areas?

—The 17 Essential Qualities of a Team Player – John Maxwell – The Daily Reader

TAKE SOME SPECIFIC STEPS TO ENLARGE YOUR TEAMMATES TODAY.

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Develop Relationships Before Starting Out

Leaders often make the common mistake of trying to lead others before developing
relationships with them. As you prepare to develop other people, take time to get to know each other. Ask them to share their story with you—their journey so far. Find out what makes them tick, their strengths and weaknesses, their temperaments. And spend some time with them outside the environment where you typically see them. If you work together, then play sports together. If you know each other from church, meet with them at their workplace.

If you go to school together, then spend some time together at home. You can even use this principle with your family. For example, if you spend time with your children outside your everyday environment, you’ll learn a lot more about them. It will develop your relationship in ways it hasn’t before, and it will help you grow.

—Your Road Map for Success – John Maxwell – The Daily Reader

GET OUT OF YOUR NORMAL ENVIRONMENT TODAY WITH SOMEONE YOU LEAD.
Free Bible Courses @ http://www.cistonline.org

Take Time to Understand People

How are you doing when it comes to being relational? Do you spend a lot of time and energy building solid relationships with your teammates, or are you so focused on results that you tend to overlook (or over-run) others as you work to achieve team goals? If the latter is true of you, think about the wise words of George Kienzle and Edward Dare in Climbing the Executive Ladder: “Few things will pay you bigger dividends than the time and trouble you take to understand people. Almost nothing will add more to your stature as an executive and a person. Nothing will give you greater satisfaction or bring you more happiness.” Becoming a highly relational person brings individual and team success.

—The 17 Essential Qualities of a Team Player – John Maxwell – The Daily Reader

BUILD SOLID RELATIONSHIPS WITH YOUR PEOPLE AND THE RESULTS WILL FOLLOW.

Manage Your Attitude Daily

One of the most significant discoveries of my life was realizing that we often place too much emphasis on making decisions and too little on managing the decisions we’ve already made. This discovery was so significant to me that I wrote a book about it called Today Matters. The thesis of the book is that successful people make right decisions early and manage those decisions daily. You can make a decision to have a good attitude, but if you don’t make plans to manage that decision every day, then you are likely to end up right back where you started. But here’s the good news: maintaining the right attitude is easier than regaining the right attitude.

How do you do that? A Chinese proverb I came across gives insight: “Assume a cheerfulness you do not feel, and shortly you feel the cheerfulness you assumed.” Or as editor and publisher Elbert Hubbard says, “Be pleasant until 10 a.m. and the rest of the day will take care of itself.” When you get up in the morning, you need to remind yourself of the decision you’ve made to have a positive attitude. You need to manage your thinking and direct your actions so that they are consistent with your decision.

If you take responsibility for your attitude—recognizing that it can change how you live, managing it every day, and cultivating and developing positive thoughts and habits—then you can make your attitude your greatest asset. It can become the difference maker in your life, opening doors and helping you overcome great obstacles.

—The Difference Maker-John Maxwell-Daily Reader
MAKE THE DECISION TO HAVE A GOOD ATTITUDE TODAY,
THEN MANAGE THAT DECISION THE REST OF THE DAY.

People Need to Know They Helped

PEOPLE NEED TO KNOW THEY HELPED
Whenever someone tells me how valuable the people on my team are to them, I encourage him to tell the individuals who were so helpful. Why? Because people need to know that they helped someone.

“Good leaders make people feel that they’re at the very heart of things, not at the
periphery,” says author and leadership expert Warren Bennis. “Everyone feels that he or she makes a difference to the success of the organization. When that happens people feel centered and that gives their work meaning.” Walter Shipley of Citibank says, “We have 68,000 employees. With a company this size, I’m not ‘running the business.’ . . . My job is to create the environment that enables people to leverage each other beyond their own individual capabilities. . . . I get credit for providing the leadership that got us there. But our people did it.” Shipley understands what successful leaders know: people need to know that they made an important contribution to reaching the goal.

It’s not a sign of weakness to let others know you value them. It’s a sign of security and strength. When you’re honest about your need for help, specific with others about the value they add, and inclusive of others as you build a team to do something bigger than you are, everybody wins.

—25 Ways to Win with People-John Maxwell-The Reader Daily

TELL THE MEMBERS OF YOUR TEAM
WHY THEY ARE VALUABLE TO YOU.

Charting the Course

CHARTING THE COURSE
Nearly anyone can steer the ship, but it takes a leader to chart the course. Before leaders take their people on a journey, they become navigators and go through a process in order to give the trip the best chance of being a success:

Navigators Draw on Past Experience: Most natural leaders are activists. They tend to look forward—not backward—make decisions, and move on. But for leaders to become good navigators, they need to take time to reflect and learn from their experiences.

Navigators Examine the Conditions Before Making Commitments: Good navigators count
the cost before making commitments for themselves and others. They examine not only
measurable factors such as finances, resources, and talent, but also intangibles such as timing, morale, momentum, culture, and so on.

Navigators Listen to What Others Have to Say: No matter how good a leader you are, you yourself will not have all the answers. That’s why top-notch navigators gather information from many sources.

Navigators Make Sure Their Conclusions Represent Both Faith and Fact: Being able to
navigate for others requires a leader to possess a positive attitude. You’ve got to have faith that you can take your people all the way. On the other hand, you also have to be able to see the facts realistically. If you don’t go in with your eyes wide open, you’re going to get blindsided.

—The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership – John Maxwell’s Daily Reader

HAVE YOU TAKEN THE TIME TO CHART THE COURSE FOR THE PEOPLE YOU’RE LEADING?

The Power of Focusing

THE POWER OF FOCUSING
What does it take to have the focus required to be a truly effective leader? The keys are
priorities and concentration. A leader who knows his priorities but lacks concentration knows what to do but never gets it done. If he has concentration but no priorities, he has
excellence without progress. But when he harnesses both, he has the potential to achieve
great things.

I frequently meet people in leadership positions who seem to major in minor things. So the important question is, How should you focus your time and energy?

Effective leaders who reach their potential spend more time focusing on what they do well
than on what they do wrong. To be successful, focus on your strengths and develop them.
That’s where you should pour your time, energy, and resources.

Growth equals change. If you want to get better, you have to keep changing and improving. That means stepping out into new areas. If you dedicate time to new things
related to areas of strength, then you’ll grow as a leader. Don’t forget: in leadership, if you’re through growing, you’re through.

Nobody can entirely avoid working in areas of weakness. The key is to minimize it as much
as possible, and leaders can do it by delegating. For example, I delegate detail work to
others. A team of people handles all the logistics of my conferences. That way when I’m
there, I stick to the things I do best, such as the actual speaking.

—The 21 Indispensable Qualities of a Leader – John Maxwell

SET YOUR PRIORITIES AND FOCUS
ON YOUR STRENGTHS TODAY.